Default

Become a Peacemaker – Peacekeeping Missions Recruitments

img

Being a peacemaker is not easy since it generally means maintaining peace in countries torn apart by civil war, rebellions and strife. It is also not possible for an individual to take the first flight out of the country to mediate between warring groups at some remote corner of the globe. There is a process to all this and it is quite complicated. Countries too cannot send their people or military to intervene in the internal affairs of another. That will be an open interference in the sovereignty of a nation. This is one reason why the UN is the central authority for all peacekeeping forces stationed around the world drawn from 193 Member States of the United Nations.

There are two aspects to this. First, the UN recruits from a wide range of backgrounds so that the peacekeeping force is as diverse as possible in terms of background, race, religion and culture. This always helps in creating a fresh perspective to the issue of peacekeeping. After recruitment, you can work in the UN Headquarters in New York in a desk job managing logistics or in any of the regional hubs of the UN in a similar capacity.

The other option and this is what UN peacekeeping forces have come to represent is field level operations. However, recruitment in peacekeeping forces is not a cakewalk or as simple as say labour hire in Melbourne, a lot of things have to be taken into account.

Field level operations are categorised into military and police forces. The first is at once ruled out for an aspiring peacemaker. The UN charter does not have provision for its own peacekeeping force and relies on contributions of military personnel from its member states. All Blue Berets – traditional colours of the UN peacekeeping force – are first members of their own national armies and are deputed to the UN peacekeeping force either to work in UN headquarters or in field operations, generally for a year.

The second route is to become a UN police officer. Most of the UN Police Officers are deputed to the Department of Police Peacekeeping Operations’ Police Division for terms ranging from 6 months to a year. For this to happen, you must contact your government that will then nominate you for the service, the rules and regulations of which varies from country to country. Another limited alternative is to apply for professional police officers posts as notified by the UN from time to time. Police Officers who are really interested in joining UN peacekeeping forces as a police officer may keep a track of vacancies notified from time to time on the United Nations Careers portal.

It is the career benefits that draw police officers from countries around the world to be a part of the peacekeeping force. Police officers get an opportunity to increase their professionalism through specialised training and studying international policing methods. It is also a great mental satisfaction to help out others in a crisis or war and many serve in more than one country during their careers.

Become a peacemaker through peacekeeping missions and be a better person individually.